About your Search

20121027
20121104
STATION
CSPAN 11
CNN 7
CNNW 6
KQED (PBS) 6
MSNBC 5
MSNBCW 5
WETA 3
KQEH (PBS) 2
KRCB (PBS) 2
WHUT (Howard University Television) 2
CNBC 1
KGO (ABC) 1
WMPT (PBS) 1
WTTG 1
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 61
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 61 (some duplicates have been removed)
was a student body president there and a college quarterback. he got his start as a civil rights leader there. he was talking to students and reminding them of the sacrifices that their parents and grandparents made when the civil rights movements happened. in durham, he led a march of students to register to vote. they have sunday registration here in north carolina and early registration period there is a two-week period where you can actually vote. there is a two-week window where you can vote. later in the day, we had alicia keys, the singer and songwriter, who had about 1000 people in raleigh at a park edit for atomic late african-american neighborhood and was urging people to vote. in a suburb of raleigh, smithfield, in a tobacco warehouse which is a schumann this warehouse, we had about 5000 people show up to here pat mccrory, the republican for governor and chris christie. this is his third trip to the state. he has campaigned so often, he says he is thinking of moving here. he has campaigned for the republican ticket. host: i'm sure they would miss the governor dearly if he were to l
, congressmen, hip hop and gospel artists as well as civil rights activists have come together over the past few hours to get voters to the polls. just a short time ago i talked to a number of folks who have gathered here, nine days before election day. i asked them why they think this thing is going to be so close. >> i think the election here in florida is going to be one of these bush-gore deals. i look for it to be -- >> you're thinking recount? >> i don't know about recount, but -- >> we hope it's about more than 537. >> yes, yes. >> thank you. >> we'll get back to politics in a moment. right now, though, we turn to the latest on hurricane sandy and for that, we've got it all covered here. nbc meteorologist dylan dreyer with the forecast and white house correspondent mike viquiera standing by with the latest on the president who just got a briefing at fema headquarters. and nbc's thanh truong is on the beach in rehoboth, did he dext let's start with dylan dreyer with the latest advisory from the national hurricane center. what can you tell us? >> we do still have to deal with a category 1 h
these issues, we're integrated. it's all integrated. it's economic, it's social, it's our civil rights. i think women take a different view. as sandra was saying, though, there is that gap between married women and what i prefer to say as unmarried women other than single women. some of us are a little older and not married. there's 52 million unmarried women. they break overwhelmingly for president obama. so i do think that in these broader numbers, some of those distinctions get lost and most important group for president obama, black women voted for him. >> right, who are the single largest group in terms of turnout in 2008. victoria, i was wondering a little bit about this idea of what does it take to create a multi-racial cross class, close enter generational women's coalition? on the one hand, we're not all the same. having ovaries or at one point having ovaries, not even get spoog the biology of it all. but that alone doesn't give you shared political interests, but it is sometimes surprising to see how different those opinions are depending on what sort of woman we're talking about. >>
? >> i think social issues do mean a great deal to us. when you look at guy marriage as the next civil rights issue of our time. we were seeing if he would take the next step and make it a federal law. when i travel around the country at the end of the day, it is everyone talking about back pocket, money, jobs, employment. >> let's talk about you're talking about pocketbook, talking about economic issues. when you look at the youth vote today, since you've been talking to them, are they more fiscally conservative than perhaps last election, seeing many of them as children of generation x-ers. that generation grew up fiscally challenged and they may have passed some of those ideas to their children. >> that taps into something, yeah. i agree with that. i authentic it explains that we have this sort of entrepreneurial spirit. when i travel around the country, i say what do you want to do when you grow up? a lot of the students i talk to aren't interested -- they are, but they don't talk about being the next lebron james or laid a gaga. they say i would love to be the next steve jobs. it'
was happening with anti-war movement and what was happening with respect to the civil rights movement, and so i would hope that we're going to see more of that. >> how come? >> because young people, they communicate in a lot of different ways and everything moves so fast today that you can set the world on fire in a positive way just through a message that goes through the internet in a way that -- i had to go buy an album or a cartridge, you know. that's old school. >> if you're re-elected, you go into a second term, sasha and malia will be in the midst of their teens. what are you most worried about, malia getting a driver's license, malia going out on a date, or malia being on facebook? >> i'd worry about facebook right now, only because, look, i know the folks at facebook, obviously they've revolutionized the social networks, but malia because she's well known, you know, i'm very keen on her protecting her privacy. she can make her own decisions obviously later as she gets older. but right now, even just for security reasons, she doesn't have a facebook page. dates, that's fine because she
was an evangelical preacher who idolized america. >> i studied civil rights and slavery. i was so affected by an american story that was so different from the way that i had seen our country. i remember just being furious, you know. >> reporter: it's that fury and indignation that have fueled rickard's work but because he's not on the scene taking the photographs, it's also controversial. on-line viewer comments can range from compelling and fascinating work to... >> this guy says lazy, pathetic and entirely uninteresting. so it's all over the board. people have commented that i'm not even a photographer. >> of course it's photography. yeah, i think that what doug is doing is looking through the... through google as part of his lens. the internet is helping redefine what it means to be a photographer. >> you see this? then you come right into here. there's damage. >> reporter: in fact, rickard says in an ocean of digital imagery creating something special is becoming more and more difficult. no matter how easy the tools are. >> i think it really boils down to what you bring to it. you know
from just the civil rights era. if you define it as being able to vote without barriers, it's still indanger. >> i wish we had more time. stay with us. much more ahead. look, if you have copd like me, you know it can be hard to breathe, and how that feels. copd includes chronic bronchitis and emphysema. much more ahead. spiriva helps control my copd symptoms by keeping my airways open for 24 hours. plus, it reduces copd flare-ups. spiriva is the only once-daily inhaled copd maintenance treatment that does both. spiriva handihaler tiotropium bromide inhalation powder does not replace fast-acting inhalers for sudden symptoms. tell your doctor if you have kidney problems, glaucoma, trouble urinating, or an enlarged prostate. these may worsen with spiriva. discuss all medicines you take, even eye drops. stop taking spiriva and seek immediate medical help if your breathing suddenly worsens, your throat or tongue swells, you get hives, vision changes or eye pain, or problems passing urine. other side effects include dry mouth and constipation. nothing can reverse copd. spiriva helps me br
. it began with the passage of the civil rights act in the '60s when the old dixiecrats like jesse helms left the democratic party because it became too racially inclusive and began gradually to take over the republican party. it's so dangerous to have one of our two big parties controlled by extremists because it makes people think that issues are equally divided when they are, in fact, not. they're 70-30 or 60-40. i think our long-term job is to take back the republican party. >> and just very quickly what is your prediction for tuesday? >> you know, it all depends who votes. if it is a lowered voter turnout, which obviously the governor and legislature of florida wants because they have cut the voting time almost in half and increased the ballot to 12 pages or something, then it will be an older, richer, whiter electorate. if it is a higher turnout, then it will be a more inclusive electorate. so a low turnout will elect romney-ryan. a high turnout, a true democratic turnout, will absolutely re-elect obama. >> yeah, and some states, from what i understand, the voting forums are like 30 pag
the civil right to make a lifelong commitment to the person you love. join me in supporting question 6. it's the right thing to do. >>> straight ahead at 8:00, surviving sandy, the east coast shuts down as the deadly superstorm moves closer from school closings to storm surges, we have you covered with live team coverage all morning long. good morning everybody, i'm tony perkins. >> i'm allison seymour. right now, the storm is making its way up the east coast, poised for a district hit on the mid-atlantic tonight. >> in preparation of that, states of emergency have been declared from virginia to massachusetts, and president obama has promised a quick federal response. experts say sandy could impact some 50 million people up and down the east coast. it is already blamed for the deaths of 65 after sweeping through the caribbeans. >> now here at home, officials aren't taking any chances. >> that's because most schools in the region are closed, so is the federal government and the dc city government. you can see the full list of delays scrolling at the top of your screen and online at myfoxdc.
's political activities from a fairly young age. >> narrator: his dad thought civil rights were worth fighting for. as a teenager, mitt was less interested in the issues than being with his dad. >> the word from his family is that he was not necessarily interested in politics as ideology. but there was always something about his father and his father's power and his father's profession that kept him around and kept him close in a way that it didn't do that for other members of his family. (newsreel music plays) >> the eyes of the nation are on san francisco as the republican party convenes to nominate its choice for president. >> narrator: and in 1964, mitt traveled with his dad to watch him take on conservative republican senator barry goldwater. >> the republican party should unequivocally repudiate extremists of the right and the left, and reject their efforts to infiltrate or attach themselves to our party or its candidates. >> mitt is absorbing all of this. he sees his father basically taking a stand and admires his father greatly for this. >> narrator: but it was barry goldwater's conven
civil rights were worth fighng for. as a teenager, mitt was less interested in the issues than being with his dad. >> the word from his family is that he was not necessarily interested in politics as ideology. but there was always something about his father and his father's power and his father's profession that kept him around and kept him close in a way that it didn't do that for other members of his family. (newsreel music plays) san fransco as the repubn aron party nvenes tnomina i choice for president >> narrator: and in 1964, mitt trav with hidedad watch him take on consvaveatat republan senat barry ldwa >> the rublican y sh unuivoy repudiat trem of thght and , and the eorts infate or a ehh selves tr pay its candidates. >> mit absorbing all o sees his fa basical taking a stand and admires his father greatly for this. >> narrator: but it was barrys goldwater's convention. >> i would remind you that extremism in the defense of liberty is no vice. (cwd cheers) >> nrator: and when water received the nomination, mitt saw his father angrily storm out. >> i think that my father was
. >> and very proud of that. they were very involved in the civil rights movement and they made me politically aware back then in the 1960s, and we're bringing back the four original members of the rascals. >> oh, great. >> good to talk to you, again. we failed to mention, we had talked before earlier in the show, so really appreciate it. we hope you get your power back and then everything works out for you and your family and your friends, and obviously we'll be supporting the money that you're going to be raising for awareness and to help those folks that are out there in the region. >> thank you. thank you, cnn, for supporting this very, very worthwhile cause. >> thank you, steven. appreciate it. >> here's what we're working on for this hour. >> just five days until the election. will it come down to ohio? plus this. >> manhattan, partially paralyzed after superstorm sandy flooded parts of the city. the fight for taxis, buses, and subway rides as people start returning to work. in blind taste tests, even ragu users chose prego. prego?! but i've bought ragu for years. [ thinking ] wonder wha
days from election day. can you believe that? and the justice department announced just today its civil rights division will send 780 federal observers to monitor polling places. it's sending personnel to 51 jurisdictions in 23 states including six battleground states. cnn's crime and justice correspondent joe johns on the case for us from washington now. joe, i would ask you why they're doing this, is this something new? i know why they're doing it, but is it new? >> it's not new quite frankly, don. they've done this before. but when you think about it go over the numbers one more time. government is going to essentially 780 observers or justice department personnel, 51 jurisdictions, 23 states, six battleground states, what we found so interesting is the number of people they're sending to individual states. florida's number one on the list. government sending observers to a total of seven different counties in the sunshine state. state of pennsylvania is the runner-up with five different counties followed by ohio and texas each with four locations. and maricopa county, arizona, home
years. a pbs series. he had come out on a series looking on civil-rights issues in america. that was a fundamental place for me to learn. i also worked on a documentary series for a long time. i learned by working in production and by immediately working on things of my own. i do think there is a benefit to the best practices, the thing that happens in an institution where you are not just struggling to make the thing. you are talking about it and you also have community and resources. if you can afford it, that is a powerful route. i happened to learn the hardest way possible, which is by working in production and not doing anything else. >> is that an issue here, the kind of methods, the institutions and the pattern and career that allows people to be trained to do watch-dog type stuff, whether they are journalists or do similar things, are those drying up? >> documentary films are interesting. in some ways, that still exists. in journalism, the apprenticeship model the newspaper used to offer is definitely going away. you have a staff of 10 and you might be able to mento
for themselves and what straight couples have right now. host: so why not civil unions? >> it's a very different institution, it is a second class institution. civil unions are ok in some states. they were definitely part of the journey towards marriage. i have a great deal of respect for the states that passed those. but unfortunately the word marriage is the only word that is recognized in federal law approximately 1300 times. so when it comes down to protecting our families it is really only the institution of marriage the right to marry that will give us those protections. i will tell you we are on a journey here as americans continuously on a number of different issues. so we have to understand that we are looking to be treated as equal in the eyes of the law and equal in terms of the common human bonds that we share with all americans. and it is really only marriage that gets you that equal standing with my straight brother and sister. host: so what protections would be different under a marriage than civil unions? >> right now the federal government has a law in place called the defensive
guaranteeing civil rights and searching for ways to live peacefully in the world. it means choosing dialogue over blame. respect over division. hope over fear. what made george a great public servant was not only his compassion and integrity, but it was his uncommon vision. he saw connections others did not see, like, the connection between political stability and hungry children. that vision became food for peace. and the mcgovern-adult education program. he also saw things sooner than others. in 1962, he said the most important issue of our time is the establishment of conditions for world peace. nine months into his first term, he gave his first speech on the non. -- vietname. -- vietnam. 1970, he warned about the dependence of the united states on fossil fuels. in 1984, he urged all of our american leadership to understand the complexity, challenges, and the volatility of circumstances in the middle east. i believe america would be a better place had george become president of the united states. [applause] that does not mean his campaign was a failure. far from it. the 1972 campaign open
of pennsylvania women. and has been appointed to the executive committee of the leadership conference on civil rights. she has authored many publications and articles including for u.s. a today and the "new york times." she has served as counsel in major litigation cases dealing with sex discrimination in schools, sexual harassment in the workplace, sex discrimination in intercollegiate athletic programs, and pay equity. among other issues. they say if you want a job well done, give it to a busy woman. and it gives me great pleasure to introduce to you a most accomplished and very busy woman. here to talk to us today about the importance of the women's vote and the 2012 election, the founder and copresident of the national women's law center marsha greenberger. >> well, thank you very much. thank you for that extraordinarily generous introduction. from the incomparable judy 11. and i have to tell you what a pleasure it is to be here and i must also confess to a personal relationship that i think had something to do with this invitation. the national women's law center has an incomparable ms. l
said at the beginning is right which is books are civilization. and i'm much more worried about sglifl civilization's survival than an industry's survival. so maintaining and spreading these all important, i think, habits of these conversation, thee intimate conversations is worries me more than what will happen to my books or to the publishers. >> one of the issues with printing is that there really is a step function in the cost of printing. you know. you print smaller quantities. it becomes more expensive. now it's certainly true that you can go print on demand. for example 80% of my company's books are now print on demand. even when we are printing 10,000 copies. you know, we're working with ingram and have done a fantastic job of building an infrastructure that let us us do whatever quantity we want. and it's integrated with a digital tool chain that allows us literally to publish a book to an ebook in five or six different formats. push it out into a digital tool. so digital distribution chain, you know, immediately so we have this new kind of logistics of book publishing which i
culpable. remember the civil stuff he saw in arizona. is that civil? for those of you keeping score, there is certainly craziness on the right. we all know that the far right did not have much clout in tamp, hardly any at the republic convention. there is a vast difference in presentation between the g.o.p. and the dems. the election referendum on barack obama. do you want his liberal governance or not? if you do want it, then you have to accept the far left loons that come along with it. that's the memo. now for the top story tonight. how is the vote shaping one six days to go. joining us now from austin, texas. fox news analyst carl rove. mr. rove, new "new york times" poll out today shows president obama doing very well in florida, ohio, virginia. dick morris going to have thoughts on that later. but, do you take that poll seriously? >> no, i don't take those three polls seriously. here is why. in florida, they have obama ahead by 1 point. they have seven points more democrats than republicans. even in 2008 there were only 3 points more democrats than republicans. similarly ohio
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 61 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)